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Golf in the UK

Tiger Woods warned of decreased enjoyment risk in golf’s distance debate

Tiger Woods has weighed into the space debate in golf and fears the sport could subsided enjoyable for amateurs and kids if equipment is modified.

Woods seemed divided with his opinions on the findings of the space Insight Project Report on Tuesday. At the end of the conversation, he concluded that further increases in golf’s average hitting distances would be undesirable and detrimental to its future.

Last week, Phil Mickelson also insisted that the increases of distance were more due to the reason that players became better athletes, instead of the equipment technology advances during his long professional career.

Woods conceded that player fitness was an element , but he admitted that golf courses were “running out of property” when trying to increase to accommodate the modern-day big-hitter, although he also warned of the necessity to stay the sport “enjoyable” at grass roots level.

“The game of golf is fluid, it’s moving, and therefore the ball is certainly going tons further now than the old balata days,” said Woods before this week’s Genesis Invitational at Riviera club, a rare tournament that he has never won.

“We want the game to abstract more participation. Having the more forgiving clubs and larger clubheads adds to the enjoyment of the sport. So there is a very delicate balancing act for where we’re trying to stay the sport at.

Woods believes bifurcation (different rules for professionals and amateurs) may be a possibility but added: “It’s certainly a discussion that’s on the table, whether we bifurcate or not, but it’s likely to be long after my playing days before we figure that out.”

Although the 15-time major champion also revealed that he has been approached to compete within the proposed Premier Golf League, he gave little away as being asked if he would plan to such a format.

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News

Plans revealed for $240m Premier Golf League

The World Golf Group (WGG) organization has unveiled plans for a replacement global tour encompassing an 18-event season offering a complete prize purse of $240m (€217.7m).

The UK-based organization’s Premier Golf League (PGL) vision is 2 years within the making and is scheduled to launch in January 2022. An eight-month season would commence in January, with 10 of the 18 tournaments being held within the US.

WGG is seeking to check in 48 players, with a private champion to be decided after the 17th event and therefore the finale to be staged as a team play-off. WGG said during a statement: “If you would like the planet to observe, you’ve got to showcase your best product, week-in-week-out. Golf doesn’t do this currently.

WGG said it’s partnered with New York-headquartered acquirer the Raine Group within the venture. Selected players would be handed part ownership of a team franchise, with WGG stating this is able to give them the prospect to share in “significant equity value”.

The prospect of a world golf tour has been mooted for quite 20 years, with WGG answering questions on how the PGL would differ from a proposal from Australian golf legend Norman that ultimately did not get off the bottom in 1994. WGG said Norman’s plan “resulted during a threat to ban its participants and therefore the creation of 4 World Golf Championships – beat the US. The planet is now a special place, restraint of trade laws have changed, and therefore the League may be a very different proposition.”

WGG said it’s keen to figure with established golf tours instead of act as a breakaway league. However, both the European Tour and PGA Tour have dismissed such a proposal.

The latest news comes after the PGA Tour announced that it’s raising the prize of the 2020 Players Championship to $15m, with the winner of the March 12-15 event at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, the US, to receive $2.7m.

The move represents a complete rise of $2.5m from last year’s event, which was won by McIlroy. It also means, for the nonce, the Players Championship can pay quite any of the main championships. Last year, the payouts for the men’s majors were: US Open ($12.5m), The Masters ($11.5m), PGA Championship ($11m) and Open ($10.75m).

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Golf in the UK

Royal Dornoch golf course named number one in world

The internationally renowned championship course at Royal Dornoch Golf Club has been named number one in the world by leading online golf reservation service, “golfscape”.

The course topped the list of the World’s Top 100 Golf Courses 2020, compiled by an extensive panel of industry leaders.

The panel said of Royal Dornoch: “Bordering the Dornoch Firth, the classic links land will offer you nothing but wild magnificent seas, skies, and mountains with ancient grass covering the dunes.”

Golfscape’s list has eight Scottish courses, including the Old Course at St Andrews (ranked no 6) and the Ailsa Course at Trump Turnberry (15).

Royal Dornoch Golf Club general manager Neil Hampton said: “This is an amazing achievement and a great tribute to every club member who works hard to make our historic course a must-play venue for golfers today.”

“The quality of the course as well as our history, including our links to Donald Ross and Old Tom Morris, is a winning combination.”

The championship course has also been ranked no four in the world in Golf Digest’s new Top 100 courses outside the US, by a panel that includes more than 1700 North American golfers and more than 350 international players.

The panel said that Herbert Warren Wind (an American golf writer) called it the most natural golf course in the world. Tom Watson called it the most fun that he had had playing golf. Donald Ross called it home, having been born in the village and learned the game on the links.

In November, the championship course was ranked no 10 in GOLF magazine’s latest Top 100 Courses in the World list.

It was second only to St Andrews’ Old Course as the highest ranking of 13 Scottish courses to make the list and was the third highest ranked of the 30 courses in Great Britain and Ireland.

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Golf in the UK

Four of The Best Golf Courses in England

When mentioning the best golfing destinations in the world, besides the US, people usually jump straight to Scotland or Ireland, despite the fact that their neighbour also offers some of the most topographically diverse golf around. With a variety of world-class golf layouts, including plenty of parkland and heathland offerings, England has a lot of golf course well worth the visit. Here is the list of England’s best golf courses with a few notable omissions.

Hotchkin Course, Woodhall Spa

The Hotchkin Course at Woodhall Spa is frequently considered as the best inland golf course in the UK. Located amongst glorious pine, this heathland layout is the finest of Lincolnshire and has been the headquarters to the English Golf Union since 1995.

Old Course, Walton Heath

It is hard to believe that the Old Course in Walton Heath is only a few miles from the M25. Once out there, you will soon be in golfing paradise amongst the beautiful heathland. Although the first 9 can play tough into a stiff, links-like wind, there are more chances to get a couple back coming home. The par-5 16th is argued to be the signature hole. The approach requires pinpoint accuracy with heather on the left and a huge bunker sucking up anything slightly right or short at the edge of the green.

Royal Lytham & St Anne’s

Situated only 10 miles from Royal Birkdale, the richness of world class links golf does not relent at Lytham & St Annes. Bordered on the west by a picturesque railway line, Blackpool Tower looms in the background. The Guardian Victorian clubhouse peers over the 11-time Open Championship layout.

Royal Birkdale

Another course on the Open rota, Birkdale held the championship for the 10th time in 2017. The famous Southport venue has also hosted the Ryder Cup twice and can be a torrid experience if the wind is blowing. Whatever the weather is like (and it really does vary here), Royal Birkdale is a challenging spot to play golf. Expect stunning views from the towering dunes that line the fairways as you plot your way round this true test of links golf.

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General

The history of golf in the UK

The beginning of golf is filled with mystery. However, we have to make it clear that Scotland is the most responsible for setting the ground on which golf is based. It can’t be negated that golf is an ancient game. Although it didn’t happen suddenly, it was the result of similar activities evolving over a long period of years. Early English version was called “Cambuca”, which was using a wooden ball. There are many evidence of the existence of golf that is linked to Scotland.

King James II

Golf gained popularity in Scotland quickly but King James II banned the game in the 15th century. When Scotland was in the war with England, and the military spent more time playing golf than practicing archery, which was a vital in defending the country. Surely, golf enthusiasts often ignored the ban, so the king had to make similar declarations two more times in the next few years. 40 years later, the ban was withdrawn as the nobleman started playing golf. In 1502, Scottish King James IV received a set of golf clubs from one the man who was producing bows and strings at that time.

Queen of Scotland

The next King James V of Scotland also played golf and was a frequent guest of Gosford in East Lothian, where he had his own private Links golf field. People assume that his daughter Mary, the Queen of Scotland, started playing golf when she was a little girl. Later, she continued to play golf at school in France. In 1567, she was criticized for playing golf right after the death of her husband, Lord Darnley.

Golf clubs

In 1735, The Royal Burgess Golfing Society of Edinburgh – the first official golf club – was founded. Then, The Honorable Company of Edinburgh Golfers was created in 1744, and ten years later, the most famous golf club in the world, The Society of St. Andrews Golfers in 1754. Historians believed that Scottish masonry lodges were financially supporting the first golf clubs. The first golf club outside of Scotland, Royal Blackheath, was formed in England in 1766. At the end of the 18th century, there were ten golf clubs in England and Scotland.

Rules Committee Meeting

We had to wait about 200 years for any standardization of the sport, in the form as we know today. It took a lot of time to make any written rules. On May 14, 1754, the first session of the Rules Committee in Golf was held by The Society of St. Andrews Golfers. There were 21 representatives of gentlemen, all for the purpose of adopting Specific Rules and Laws related to Healthy Golfing. Those people could not even dream of what they actually started, but it was enough that they were all passionate about golf.